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The big man- smaller man match dynamic

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  • #16
    Re: The big man- smaller man match dynamic

    Originally posted by Emperor View Post
    The problem with most huge wrestlers is that the only logical way to work the match is for the big guy to dominate most of the match because of his sheer size advantage and then lose somehow. See the various John Cena vs Big Show matches for good examples. This isn't necessarily bad in itself, but it is quite limiting, and Big Show on offense isn't the most compelling thing in the world. It's the same in New Japan. Tanahashi or Okada vs Bad Luck Fale is exactly the same kinda match, and it isn't very good. Most of that is on the big man.

    Immovable object goliath wrestlers are not the must-see special attraction they once were. Nowadays the workrate is so much faster than even the big guys have to be quite athletic. That's exactly what we're seeing with the likes of Braun Strowman and Baron Corbin. The recent Cena vs Corbin match on Smackdown was structured exactly the same as Cena vs Big Show, but it was a lot better because Corbin on offense is more interesting to watch than Big Show on offense.

    I don't think the big man vs big man spectacle will ever lose its appeal as long as it's not done too frequently. Show vs Strowman is the most entertaining match I've seen on Raw in a long time. Strowman's athleticism was a big part of that, but Show did his part as well.
    I think much of that comes down to the big guys being on TV week in and week out so they're not a novelty anymore. Have a roster populated of dudes who are 6'5, 250 at the most and then all of a sudden there's Big Show and no one will care whether he can barely move anymore.

    Nominee: PW's Most Knowledgeable Poster, 2006
    Co-winner: PW's Most Knowledgeable Nerd, 2006

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: The big man- smaller man match dynamic

      Originally posted by Emperor View Post
      The problem with most huge wrestlers is that the only logical way to work the match is for the big guy to dominate most of the match because of his sheer size advantage and then lose somehow. See the various John Cena vs Big Show matches for good examples. This isn't necessarily bad in itself, but it is quite limiting, and Big Show on offense isn't the most compelling thing in the world. It's the same in New Japan. Tanahashi or Okada vs Bad Luck Fale is exactly the same kinda match, and it isn't very good. Most of that is on the big man.

      Immovable object goliath wrestlers are not the must-see special attraction they once were. Nowadays the workrate is so much faster than even the big guys have to be quite athletic. That's exactly what we're seeing with the likes of Braun Strowman and Baron Corbin. The recent Cena vs Corbin match on Smackdown was structured exactly the same as Cena vs Big Show, but it was a lot better because Corbin on offense is more interesting to watch than Big Show on offense.

      I don't think the big man vs big man spectacle will ever lose its appeal as long as it's not done too frequently. Show vs Strowman is the most entertaining match I've seen on Raw in a long time. Strowman's athleticism was a big part of that, but Show did his part as well.
      I think much of that comes down to the big guys being on TV week in and week out so they're not a novelty anymore. Have a roster populated of dudes who are 6'5, 250 at the most and then all of a sudden there's Big Show and no one will care whether he can barely move anymore.

      Nominee: PW's Most Knowledgeable Poster, 2006
      Co-winner: PW's Most Knowledgeable Nerd, 2006

      Comment

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