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Playing Sports: Are They Really Worth It?

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  • #31
    Re: Playing Sports: Are They Really Worth It?

    Originally posted by Shawn Michaels View Post
    I got a question...how can they design a nascar helmet that allows drivers to slam into a wall at 200 mph and be fine?....I don't see Richard Petty walking around not talking well...he seems pretty sharp...surly with the technology today designing proper safety equipment shouldn't be that hard.
    A few thoughts:

    Most cars don't hit 200 mph for a long period of time. Probably 160-170 MPH on average through out a race. They also padded walls up ( even more after Kyle Busch's wreck last year) to make them safer when a driver hit it. Also, after Dale Earnhardt Sr. died in a wreck, the made the HANS device mandatory, which keeps a person's head a d neck stable in a wreck. It's less about the helmet, and more about all of the other safety precautions they take.

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    • #32
      Re: Playing Sports: Are They Really Worth It?

      Originally posted by StunVKMcmahon View Post
      Oh wah. I've had multiple concussions, multiple back surgeries, 2 bad knees with no cartilage left, 9 blown discs in my back and neck. I did martial arts for close to a decade, played football, wrestled, baseball, and boxed. I loved every minute of all of that. But I never went pro in any sport. At least these guys have the money to get the best treatment.
      You could wreck your body doing damned near anything. Falling down a flight of stairs. Car accident. Taking a line drive to the head sitting in the stands. Mugging.
      But sports taught and gave me a lot. Teamwork. Discipline. Proper training methods. Flexibility. Creativity. Quick decision making.
      Sports aren't bad. But anyone could get hurt on or off the field.
      Now do we need to do a better job protecting players when possible? Absolutely. If the ability to prevent injury exists, it should be made available.
      We need to not blame any sport itself but continue to work hard at making those sports safer. I think we have done a much better job over the last decade at keeping players safer. Prior to that it was never a big concern to teams, coaches, or even players to recognize and prevent injury.
      The bolded part is the issue not the injuries. There are ways to teach all of that stuff without injuring anyone. But the real issue is how to make sports safer and what to do about injuries that do happen. But I have a hard time believing any parent thinks it's worth it when their kid dies or ends up paralysed because they were injured playing a sport.

      With any sport, things can be done perfectly and an injury can still happen. Injuries happen everywhere and at any time.

      But, statistically, you aren't likely to suffer a spinal injury walking down the street. However, statistically, you ARE likely to suffer one playing football. That's the issue and the reason why someone would question whether it's worth it.

      The only sport I've seen injury analysis for is the NFL. The NFL has a roughly 25% injury rate (defined as serious enough to miss games). But it isn't just the number of injuries that occur but the type and how to limit the most serious ones.

      For example, chop blocks are the easiest and most likely cause of knee injuries in the NFL. Diving into someone's unprotected knee joint is the easiest way to injure someone on the football field. The easiest way to prevent this is by making chop blocks illegal. Yet, the NFL allows them as long as the defender isn't engaged with another player. And even that change wasn't made until the 1990s.

      Major League Baseball made rule changes to prevent home plate collisions in an effort to reduce injuries. It only took them 140 or so years to do it despite knowing full well what the risk was. It just wasn't until players made $20 million per year guaranteed that it became important to keep them on the field.

      Colleges do a very poor job of limiting injuries or providing adequate care to their student athletes.

      There are a lot of injuries that occur in sports that can be prevented but simply aren't for various reasons. That's the real issue.
      Insei makes the best banners and avs
      "If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all."
      "It is the responsibility of intellectuals to speak the truth and expose lies."
      Both quotes by Noam Chomsky
      "We are all Africans." -- Richard Dawkins
      Sports Empire HOF 2008 PW HOF 2015

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Playing Sports: Are They Really Worth It?

        Originally posted by StunVKMcmahon View Post
        Oh wah. I've had multiple concussions, multiple back surgeries, 2 bad knees with no cartilage left, 9 blown discs in my back and neck. I did martial arts for close to a decade, played football, wrestled, baseball, and boxed. I loved every minute of all of that. But I never went pro in any sport. At least these guys have the money to get the best treatment.
        You could wreck your body doing damned near anything. Falling down a flight of stairs. Car accident. Taking a line drive to the head sitting in the stands. Mugging.
        But sports taught and gave me a lot. Teamwork. Discipline. Proper training methods. Flexibility. Creativity. Quick decision making.
        Sports aren't bad. But anyone could get hurt on or off the field.
        Now do we need to do a better job protecting players when possible? Absolutely. If the ability to prevent injury exists, it should be made available.
        We need to not blame any sport itself but continue to work hard at making those sports safer. I think we have done a much better job over the last decade at keeping players safer. Prior to that it was never a big concern to teams, coaches, or even players to recognize and prevent injury.
        The bolded part is the issue not the injuries. There are ways to teach all of that stuff without injuring anyone. But the real issue is how to make sports safer and what to do about injuries that do happen. But I have a hard time believing any parent thinks it's worth it when their kid dies or ends up paralysed because they were injured playing a sport.

        With any sport, things can be done perfectly and an injury can still happen. Injuries happen everywhere and at any time.

        But, statistically, you aren't likely to suffer a spinal injury walking down the street. However, statistically, you ARE likely to suffer one playing football. That's the issue and the reason why someone would question whether it's worth it.

        The only sport I've seen injury analysis for is the NFL. The NFL has a roughly 25% injury rate (defined as serious enough to miss games). But it isn't just the number of injuries that occur but the type and how to limit the most serious ones.

        For example, chop blocks are the easiest and most likely cause of knee injuries in the NFL. Diving into someone's unprotected knee joint is the easiest way to injure someone on the football field. The easiest way to prevent this is by making chop blocks illegal. Yet, the NFL allows them as long as the defender isn't engaged with another player. And even that change wasn't made until the 1990s.

        Major League Baseball made rule changes to prevent home plate collisions in an effort to reduce injuries. It only took them 140 or so years to do it despite knowing full well what the risk was. It just wasn't until players made $20 million per year guaranteed that it became important to keep them on the field.

        Colleges do a very poor job of limiting injuries or providing adequate care to their student athletes.

        There are a lot of injuries that occur in sports that can be prevented but simply aren't for various reasons. That's the real issue.
        Insei makes the best banners and avs
        "If we don't believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don't believe in it at all."
        "It is the responsibility of intellectuals to speak the truth and expose lies."
        Both quotes by Noam Chomsky
        "We are all Africans." -- Richard Dawkins
        Sports Empire HOF 2008 PW HOF 2015

        Comment

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