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Thread: Fur babies

  1. #1
    Theend Is Here Theend's Avatar

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    Default Fur babies

    First off, this is a term that I have never heard a male use. Only women. When is the case of a woman identifying her pets as children or having them as a replacement for children a psychological condition? Having an unnatural replacement for children is not a healthy human behavior. But it has been nurtured by our society.

    The urge to parent is natural but the replacement of parenting children with something else is not. Referring to pets as babies, your boys or girls, sons and daughters is unnatural. We all know there is a safe side of doing this but we all know someone who is on the other side. Some fur baby parents have done lost it. They identify with their pets as their kids. It doesn't sound nutty only because we have become conditioned to hearing it. But if you ever hear an adult refer to his mother's fur baby as like a little brother to him I bet you may shake your head. Or older brother, I can't decide which sounds crazier.

    Fun article on the notion that inspired this post.

    http://thefederalist.com/2017/05/09/...J3ZkA.facebook
    I am your God

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    Default Re: Fur babies

    I think you're being too literal with the terms here. A small amount of pet owners are definitely delusional (instances of people telling me their pet reptiles "love" them spring to mind), some go overboard pampering or emotionally investing in their pets too. However, these instances seem distinct to me from the general trend of women metaphorically describing their pets as children and even buying frivolous things for them. The really delusional people actually seem to be much older and usually need pets because they've ruined either all their meaningful social relationships or even the ability to build new ones.

    The article itself has a poorly thought-out premise. It's a bad attempt by the author at characterizing behavior he doesn't understand as socially maladaptive (and therefore justifying his disapproval). The author never manages to establish that rising rates of pet ownership and and spending money on pet accessories has any relation towards the trend of delayed parenthood. The only evidence he offers is the prevalence of people describing themselves and their pets as "dog moms" and "fur babies" respectively, as if someone using the phrase isn't speaking metaphorically but revealing they're afflicted by some harmful psychological disorder. This is juxtaposed with statistics showing millenials (defined rather loosely here) have lower rates of marriage and home ownership than baby boomers did 50 years ago, but own pets at a higher rate. Quoting the opening paragraph of the section titled Choosing pets over progeny:

    Quote Originally Posted by Pets Over Progeny
    In September, the Washington Post reported on findings from research firm Mintel that quantify the replacement-baby epidemic. Young Americans are less likely than their parents to own a car or a home, and half as likely to be married as Americans were 50 years ago. But we have a handy lead over the baby-boomers in one area: pet ownership. The frontrunners of the millennial pack who’ve already entered careers could be rechristened the “dog-boomers.
    The implication here is that younger people are sacrificing traditional hallmarks of adulthood because they overvalue pet ownership. The different economic and social realities that distinguish millenials from the baby boomer generation are not explored any further than to attempt to dismiss it with a poor anecdote: just shop at thrift stores like I do. Of course there's no logical reason having a pet prevents you from getting married, buying a home and having children either. It's all a non-sequitur.

    Another revealing quote:
    I can tell everything I need to know about a person by whether he “got a dog,” or “adopted a dog.” The pretense that buying luxury items like indoor pets is somehow altruistic or noble will strike future observers as one of the oddest habits of the millennial generation. It’s even becoming common to hear pet owners tell the story of how they “rescued” their dog or cat, as if they snatched it from a burning building at the peril of their own lives.
    Take note of the contempt expressed in the first sentence. The author here really just has an axe to grind and this whole article or blog post was a foolish attempt at making his dislike of people overindulging their pets seem profound.

  3. #3
    Man with a Plan Ness's Avatar

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    Default Re: Fur babies

    I first heard the term when I started looking into the childfree community. To be honest I've always found it cringey as fuck. Just babysteps to the crazy cat lady. People do get a weird attachment to pets. For instance my Dad insists on calling his dog... my sister. Yeah, no.

  4. #4
    is not your buddy, guy.

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    Default Re: Fur babies

    Thank you for this thread. This drives me nuts.

    I watched two children tear my wife in half. I know what it's like to go a week with barely any sleep. I know what it's like to cook the perfect meal and watch a shitty toddler throw it at the wall and scream at you.

    Yeah, some people just say it out of convenience and don't really mean it, and I can almost accept that...almost.

    It's a FUCKING ANIMAL. You're insulting real parents whether you mean to or not.

    "Well I have kids and still refer to my pets as babies." Goos for you. You should know better and you still do it. That's worse.

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